Uganda: easing the strain on access to learning materials – project poster

As Uganda seeks to attain its Millennium Development Goal (MDG) on education, local civil society groups identified several problems that need to be addressed in the 2006 Copyright and Neighbouring Rights Act, as well as opportunities that can be harnessed to increase access to knowledge. The results of an EIFL-IP supported project, led by the Center for Health, Human Rights and Development (CEHURD), the Consortium of Uganda University Libraries (CUUL) and the (nabotu.or.ug) National Book Trust of Uganda (NABOTU) to initiate a process of copyright law reform in Uganda, are described in a case study and illustrated in a project poster.

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TYPE:
Poster
DATE:
November 2013
DOCUMENT LANGUAGE:
English
OTHER LANGUAGES:

As Uganda seeks to attain its Millennium Development Goal (MDG) on education, local civil society groups identified several problems that need to be addressed in the 2006 Copyright and Neighbouring Rights Act, as well as opportunities that can be harnessed to increase access to knowledge. For example if open content licensing, such as Creative Commons Uganda launched in December 2012, was nurtured along with the development of open access institutional repositories, strong copyright exceptions and a relaxation on book imports, the strain on access to educational materials in Uganda would be considerably eased.

An EIFL-IP supported project, led by the Center for Health, Human Rights and Development (CEHURD), the Consortium of Uganda University Libraries (CUUL) and the (nabotu.or.ug) National Book Trust of Uganda (NABOTU) initiated a process to start a reform of the copyright law in Uganda, include the library community in a network of civil society advocates, and to promote Creative Commons initiatives among libraries in Uganda.

The project results are described in a case study and illustrated in a project poster, one of eight EIFL-IP funded projects in 2013 for advocacy campaigns in support of copyright law reform in Africa, Asia, and Europe.